THIRST Project teaches students about the importance of water

Students listen to THIRST Project Road Warriors inform them about the importance of having access to safe drinking water in Erin Domokos' English class on March 16. Photo used with permission of Erin Domokos.

Students listen to THIRST Project Road Warriors inform them about the importance of having access to safe drinking water in Erin Domokos' English class on March 16. Photo used with permission of Erin Domokos.

Zoie Soehngen, Reporter

Life without water is hard to think about, but women and children in Africa that have to walk 3.75 miles everyday to get the small amount of water that they need to live.

An organization called Thirst Project, a group of young students, fight to end the global water crisis.

“Thirst Project was started back in 2008 when just seven college students from Los Angeles heard about the global water crisis and decided to do something about it,” member Kellen Brewer said. “In that one day, those students turned $70 into $1,700.”

English teacher Erin Domokos had two students from the Thirst Project come in and speak to her classes about how they could help this cause.

“I want my students to educate themselves on their roles as global citizens.  If this becomes a passion for them, awareness, organization and perhaps funding would be the next steps in helping this cause,” Domokos said.

This project is 100 percent non-profit. All of the money raised goes towards paying for the clean water wells built in Swaziland and other countries that the team visits to help out.

The members, also known as Road Warriors, encourage students to set up fundraising events and activities to support the organization’s water projects abroad. This is how the organization gets the money to get supplies to fix the water crisis in other countries.

For more information on the Thirst Project, click here.

To contact Road Warrior Kellen Brewer, email him at [email protected]